Recipe: Good Food

We hate to waste food, but since we couldn’t eat it, we played with it. It’s alarming how well it gums and sticks together.

Don’t ask me how food imitation products made it into my breadbox and refrigerator. With various progeny wandering in and out over the month, assorted highly artificialized items sneaked in, many of which I wasn’t even aware until the Norwegian Artist asked, “What’s this stuff?”

If you want fresh, good, unadulterated food, consider growing something, anything, yourself. Child of Eden, original oil painting by Steve Henderson.

Not one to waste food, even the imitation product, we put the commercial bread and yellowrubber cheese stuff to good use, as you can see from the headline photo. College Girl and the Son and Heir, recreating their childhood days with homemade PlayDoh, sculpted these various products into ornaments that, due to the various preservatives laced throughout, should last for centuries to come.

Food is a precious commodity, and I don’t like wasting it. When the list of ingredients, however, is 10 lines long and filled with multi-syllabic words that I can’t pronounce, much less understand, I am reluctant to ingest. So in the effort to not waste food, we fed it — or attempted to feed it — to the chickens.

“I can’t give the chickens this bread,” the Son and Heir reported. “It’s so soft that they’ll choke on it.” Thus, the sculptured faces.

We are approaching the end of one year, the beginning of another. If food has always been an afterthought for you, something that you inhale while you’re thinking about or doing something else, give yourself a gift by making a New Year’s resolution that is worthy of keeping:

Eat better.

Stop buying stuff in boxes and learn how to make something, anything for yourself. Join me on Tuesdays for simple, easy recipes that taste good and use real, basic food items that are inexpensive and easy to find.

As a bonus, you’ll save money, because when you’re dependent upon others to create what you eat, three times a day, you pay for that privilege.

This month, the Norwegian Artist and I celebrate our 31st wedding anniversary, and we will celebrate it, as we always do, with a special meal — created at home — which we share with whatever family members happen to be around at the time.

Food is a necessity, but it is also a pleasure. Increase that pleasure by taking time to enjoy what you eat. Afternoon Tea, original oil painting by Steve Henderson; licensed open edition print at Great Big Canvas.

Throughout the years, cooking for ourselves has saved money, and saving money has enabled us, on a moderate income, to live in a home and on land that we own — no mortgage.

I talk about this in my book, Live Happily on Less, which I suggest you consider as a New Year’s gift to yourself (digital, $5.99; paperback, $12.99 but usually less, at Amazon.com)

Make changes, real changes, this year that you can keep and that are worth keeping.

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